Queen Victorias Enemies (4) by Ian Knight

Strategy

By Ian Knight

Because of the unfold of British strategic and advertisement pursuits throughout the Victorian interval, the British army was once referred to as upon to serve in theatres the world over. many of the combating was once critical; it took approximately 30 years of intermittent struggle to suppress Maori competition to settler growth in New Zealand.

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The Soviet Union has overcome what seemed an insuperable handicap and now possesses a maritime strength which although not equal to that of the United States and its allies, is sufficient to present an effective challenge to that ability to use the seas in peace and war, which they see as essential to survival. To understand how this increase in maritime strength has come about and its possible future development, it is necessary to look more closely at the political and economic framework within which it has grown.

14 Despite references to 'Democracy' and 'Socialist Self-Government' in these and other speeches, Gorbachev repeatedly emphasised that, just as the Party must take responsibility for past failures, so it alone could identify and implement the necessary reforms. It must be revitalised by ridding itself of incompetence and corruption, by being more open in the election of officials and by keeping in closer touch with the masses. The future depended on 'Further strengthening of the Party and the heightening of its organising and directing role ...

In earlier days it was expected that the loyalty of the armed forces would become more assured as former Tsarist officers were replaced by younger generations, educated in the new military academies where ideological and political instruction would figure largely. One indication of the success of this procedure has been the increasing number of military officers becoming Party members and the emergence of a significant military contingent in the Central Committee. 28 The Sea in Soviet Strategy In the 1920s only 20 per cent were Party members, by the 1930s this had risen to 70 per cent and, since 1945, the proportion has risen to its present size of some 90 per cent.

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