Cruelty and Companionship: Conflict in Nineteenth Century by A. James Hammerton

England

By A. James Hammerton

Cruelty and Companionship is an account of the intimate yet darker facets of marriage in Victorian and Edwardian England. Hammerton attracts upon formerly unpublished fabric from the files of the divorce courtroom and magistrates' courts to problem many renowned perspectives approximately altering kin styles. His findings open an extraordinary window onto the sexual politics of lifestyle and the regimen tensions which conditioned marriage in center and dealing type households. utilizing modern proof starting from prescriptive texts and public debate to autobiography and fiction, Hammerton examines the serious public scrutiny which followed the regimen publicity of marital breakdown, and charts a growing to be critique of men's behaviour in marriage which more and more demanded law and reform. The serious discourse which resulted, starting from paternalist to feminist, casts new gentle at the origins and trajectory of 19th century feminism, felony swap and our figuring out of the altering expression of masculinity.

Show description

Read or Download Cruelty and Companionship: Conflict in Nineteenth Century Married Life (1995) PDF

Similar england books

John Stuart Mill: A Biography

Nicholas Capaldi's biography of John Stuart Mill strains the ways that Mill's many endeavors are comparable and explores the importance of his contributions to metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, social and political philosophy, the philosophy of faith, and the philosophy of schooling. Capaldi exhibits how Mill was once groomed for his existence through either his father James Mill and Jeremy Bentham, the 2 so much widespread philosophical radicals of the early nineteenth century.

The Knight in Medieval England, 1000-1400 (Medieval Military Library)

The writer attracts on clean study for a brand new interpretation of the particular function of the knight in England throughout the center a while. The knight underwent a means of evolution from a fixed warrior of modest capacity to a major member of the medieval hierarchy, with vital neighborhood administrative features as well as army tasks.

Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke, and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition

In Regimens of the brain, Sorana Corneanu proposes a brand new method of the epistemological and methodological doctrines of the best experimental philosophers of seventeenth-century England, an procedure that considers their usually neglected ethical, mental, and theological parts. Corneanu specializes in the perspectives concerning the pursuit of information within the writings of Robert Boyle and John Locke, in addition to in these of numerous in their affects, together with Francis Bacon and the early Royal Society virtuosi.

Additional resources for Cruelty and Companionship: Conflict in Nineteenth Century Married Life (1995)

Sample text

55 More intriguing, though, is its coupling of condemnation of London workers with justifications of violence against wives whose moral or domestic duty fell short of respectable standards, where husbands had no legal recourse against them. Middle-class outrage against wife assault, in this sense, continued to be qualified by acceptance that it could still be men’s ultimate legitimate sanction against recalcitrant wives. Such pronouncements reflect a wider intention to cultivate images of respectable working-class manhood, where gender and family relations, as well as political behaviour, were central.

79 These sources, originating from working-class men themselves, though far from conclusive, do bring us somewhat closer to their own perceptions than do the politically inspired attacks of the conservative press. 80 His advice is pertinent to the anxiety evident here stemming from men’s private behaviour. There were dear contradictions embodied between the discourse of domestic harmony and the more private lived experience of working-class men imbued with notions of self-improvement and respectability during an important transitional period.

It is possible, too, that feelings of guilt over treatment of their wives may have been bound up with sentimentality in memories of their mothers. 79 These sources, originating from working-class men themselves, though far from conclusive, do bring us somewhat closer to their own perceptions than do the politically inspired attacks of the conservative press. 80 His advice is pertinent to the anxiety evident here stemming from men’s private behaviour. There were dear contradictions embodied between the discourse of domestic harmony and the more private lived experience of working-class men imbued with notions of self-improvement and respectability during an important transitional period.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.46 of 5 – based on 32 votes