Castles and Fortified Cities of Medieval Europe: An by Jean-Denis G.G. Lepage

Strategy

By Jean-Denis G.G. Lepage

Throughout the heart a long time, castles and different fortified structures have been a standard characteristic of the ecu panorama. As valuable powers rose and fell, the lack of confidence of the time encouraged a revival of fortification strategies first brought within the Roman Empire. regardless of obstacles in building ideas and manpower, medieval fortifications have been constantly tailored to satisfy new political conditions and guns expertise. this is an illustrated advisor to the structure of medieval fortifications, from the 1st castles to the fortified towns of the 15th and 16th centuries. In thousands of distinct and punctiliously researched pen-and-ink drawings, artist Jean-Denis G.G. Lepage introduces the reader to a heterogeneous crew of structures whose exact features exhibit the advance and variety of eu medieval army structure. every one drawing is observed through special textual content describing kinds of constructions (e.g., moat-and-bailey castles), integrated defenses (arrow splits, pepper-pot towers), and specific castles and towns (the Mont-Saint-Michel, the town of Jerusalem). parts of medieval struggle and weaponry also are coated in drawings and textual content

Show description

Read or Download Castles and Fortified Cities of Medieval Europe: An Illustrated History PDF

Similar strategy books

Castles and Fortified Cities of Medieval Europe: An Illustrated History

In the course of the heart a while, castles and different fortified structures have been a standard characteristic of the ecu panorama. As principal powers rose and fell, the lack of confidence of the time encouraged a revival of fortification thoughts first brought within the Roman Empire. regardless of obstacles in development recommendations and manpower, medieval fortifications have been consistently tailored to satisfy new political conditions and guns know-how.

Queen Victorias Enemies (4)

As a result of unfold of British strategic and advertisement pursuits through the Victorian interval, the British army was once referred to as upon to serve in theatres internationally. many of the struggling with used to be critical; it took approximately 30 years of intermittent war to suppress Maori competition to settler enlargement in New Zealand.

Roots of Strategy. Book 1

Writings of sunlight Tzu, Vegetius, Marshal Maurice de Saxe, Frederick the good, and Napoleon.

Extra info for Castles and Fortified Cities of Medieval Europe: An Illustrated History

Sample text

It was fortified by a ditch, which could be filled with water from the lake, and an earth wall crowned by a stockade. Hunneschans was in some ways similar to the Scandinavian and British ringforts. It was used as a refuge for the local peasantry until the 13th century. motte could be completely man-made—an important or even enormous undertaking—but if there was a suitable hill in the area it would be adapted by scarping, that is, cutting vertically down the sides and digging away the lower slopes.

48 2—Military Architecture from the 10th to the 12th Centuries Rochester (Britain). Rochester, situated east of London in Kent, was founded by the Ro­ mans. Called Durobrivae, the fortified city was intended to defend the mouth of the river Medway and the road from Dover to London. Rochester castle was originally a motteand-bailey castle built by the Normans. About 1087 the bishop Gandulf ordered the erec­ tion of a stone donjon similar to that of London. Rochester castle was a massive square 21 m by 21 m, 36 m high, divided in four stories with corner turrets.

The hi­ erarchical separation of the motte-and-bailey castle in two parts was obvious. The upper part reflected the lord's authority; it was a nobleman's residence and a place of command. The lower part was for the servants, whose task was to make their master's life as comfortable as early medieval life allowed. The dimensions of the motte-and-bailey castle were generally calculated according to the range of a bow. This very ancient weapon was revived in the time of Charle­ magne, and its employ was the dominating influence in medieval warfare and fortifications.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.35 of 5 – based on 11 votes