Afrikaners of the Kalahari: White Minority in a Black State by Margo Russell, Martin Russell

Nonfiction 4

By Margo Russell, Martin Russell

The preferred snapshot of the Kalahari is a romantic considered one of wasteland area and untouched Bushmen. the preferred snapshot of the Afrikaners is of a distinct and cruel racialism. but Afrikaners were dwelling within the Kalahari for greater than 100 years, their presence frequently studiously missed by means of writers; and because 1961 autonomous Botswana with its coverage of scrupulous non-racialism has embraced either Afrikaner and Bushman in universal citizenship. This e-book makes an attempt to explain the complicated and mundane truth of ethnic kin within the Kalahari, not just within the current, harried through relentless strain to go into the money economic system of modernisation, yet long ago. utilizing oral background as a resource, the authors describe the 'Africanisation' of those terrible white pastoralists of the inner, bring to a halt by means of the thirstland from these impacts which gave modern Afrikanerdom its specific solid. They describe the pragmatic family built by way of Afrikaners with different peoples of the internal, and the way those were perceived and redefined with the decisive shift in political energy from British to Tswana arms.

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Sample text

Then we used to buy salt and take it to the Ovambos and the Moemoeryas, and exchange for mealies. We went on ox wagons, three or four days' journey. There were more than two hundred Afrikaans families there. We had farm schools and not many teachers. The teacher was the one who had more education than the rest. Children did not go to school every day. When I came to South West I could not read or write but I knew how to count. A predikant came two or three times a year to baptise the children. When the Portuguese wanted us to give up our school and our church and our language we sent people to the Union [of South Africa] to ask, and they said we must come to South West.

In Angola we had cattle. Most people had cattle. It's a very fertile land with rivers. We did not have windpumps or engines, there were springs. My father used to go out with ox wagons and chop down trees, and cut them into nice rectangles and take them and sell them to the Portuguese as planks, and they gave us money. Then we used to buy salt and take it to the Ovambos and the Moemoeryas, and exchange for mealies. We went on ox wagons, three or four days' journey. There were more than two hundred Afrikaans families there.

The idea as often as not has the support of all races. . '25 When the farms were offered for sale five years later, the government came very close to implementing the 1954 petition. Economic criteria dominated the selection of freeholders, but only whites were invited to apply; Coloured and 'admixtures of races' were segregated at Xanagas some 150 kilometres to 33 Into the cash economy the west. Long-established local residents were given preferential purchase terms over newcomers. Ill Farms were offered at a low price, one rand per morgen, and on easy terms: payable over fourteen years.

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